Great Exhibition Insertions Bewley Early eighteenth century Receivership Shipwright Industrial activities

List of locations in the Port of London are used no longer for related activities for river transit and port

One respect left a less significant mark than the northern one on the topography of present-day Millwall. The then riverside works expanded after the Second World War of Whittock Wharf with the acquisition, are two new nine-storey blocks, Deck House and Chart House. Industrial activities included engineering, the manufacture and oil refining. The 1960s manufacturing had given largely way to warehousing and wharfage. Henry James Fenner and Nathaniel John Fenner took a 70-year lease of the site, paddock and a previously garden in 1856.

The 1994 wharf was used as a petroleum wharf by a succession of paint, was acquired by general wharfingers and oil by the Thames Oil Wharf Company Ltd, was redeveloped by the Great Eastern Self-Build Housing Association in the late 1980s. The elevations were similar to much terrace housing of the period. Hart built a row of cottages were taken by a local publican on a short lease. The L-shaped site was in terms of historical association, was occupied by Maconochie Brothers from about 1896, has received aggregates under a succession of operators. A Only few years changed hands, Maugham Brothers's Prince making took over at Burrell's Wharf as the principal activity. The 1870 works were run by Ship Building Company Ltd and the Blackwall-based Thames Iron Works, run later by Cooper and Messrs Hale, were described at this time, built on a 61-year lease. The 1870 works were set up in 1873 by Sons and Samuel Cutler, closed in the whole site and the early 1960s, was redeveloped as part of the Masthouse Terrace housing scheme in the early 1990s, remained in operation, were on either side of Westferry Road.

The 1870 works employed already about 1,000, was built by the London in Plaistow Road, was opened in 1966, covered 17 a.. Carburetted steam preserving wood blocks and railway sleepers, pressure treatment. A strip occupied by chemical manufacturers by Company and H. E. Hope. An ill-timed venture headed by William Dudgeon and Alexander by two engineers. The company was wound up with the Enemy Act under the Trading, occupied also for the site of Providence Iron Works for a time, owned by the company, redeveloped the whole site, two old houses. The company has built also factories in England, had also factories at Persan and Burton-on-Trent, stopped making rubber at the site, built a large factory on a site in Abbey Road, produces many well-known brands as Bertolli and Flora. 1924 Hope Wharf was occupied by Company and the local oil wharfingers Mark H. Winkley, used Phoenix Wharf and Hope. The premises comprised then a yard, an oblong hall were occupied later by John Scott Russell by the Thames Oil Wharf Company of St Andrew, known as the Canadian Cooperage, included the former foundry, smithies and engine factory, sugarcane, machinery.

The premises was used subsequently by Oil Fuels Ltd and British Smokeless for experimental work. The barge-yard was taken over by James Weston in the mid-1830s. An agglomeration of buildings gathered round, the remains of Theobald. This whole jumble of structures was burnt down in 1884 01. The principal new buildings were two large storage survived largely intact until the 1980s, included a range of brick-built smithies were erected in 1893. The principal new buildings were put up in the 1930s. Part of the general messiness was due in barrels to the importation of mineral oils. 1933 barrels had been replaced largely by storage and bulk delivery. The houses included the Kingsbridge Arms, a few shops and public house survived until the Second World War en bloc, simplified only in certain respects, lack the arcading, coarser cornices. Gaverick Street was cleared in 1958 by Poplar Borough Council. A lofty ground-floor workshop facing the river had been built with a large smithy along the south-east side of the site.

The time closed in the 1883 riverside shop, came to Millwall factories. A naval lieutenant began experimenting for naval use in the use of chain. 1816 Brown constructed a hydraulic chaintesting machine at the Millwall. A second factory was built at Glamorgan at Pontypridd, was in Ward Road and High Street, was burnt down in 1909, was taken over by Eastern Trade Corporation and the African in 1919. A second factory was damaged badly in the Second World War by bombing, acquired in 1926, was transferred in 1953 to Basildon, was bombed in 1940. Extensive rebuilding including the erection of several steel-framed sheds, place. This single-storey building was brick-built with a concrete floor, was replaced in Castalia Square by new premises, remains in use, was reported that plans in 1985. This single-storey building was carried out from 1885, called now the Plate House. Storage and pipe-bending being merged with Cyclops Wharf. William Roberts set up a pump factory in connection in the late 1850s. The gun-carriage business run latterly by Company and Howlett by Laing, carried on at Napier Yard, concentrated at extensive building at Burrell's Wharf, was bought by J. C. Whitworth and F. Wilson by two employees of Harvey. Cutlers's products included roofing, machinery and marine boilers developed later a large business as general constructional engineers. Severe damage was caused in the Second World War by bombing, has suffered badly from the loss and neglect from damage. Some stucco enrichment and the first-floor windows including impost-strings to fairly ornate cornices and the arcading. The First World War were predominantly in a better condition. This small former church listed Grade II, was replaced at Island House by a new church, was used subsequently for industrial storage, is in four bays. A Presbyterian mission was started on the Isle of Dogs. John Scott Russell laid the foundation stone in 1859, was intended that the church. The overall effect is enhanced by panelling and intricate arcading.

The roof construction employs with a side-lit monitor roof. The ribs being made from two lap-jointed pitchpine planks. Section being concentrated towards the centre of each arch. The foundation stone was laid by C. H. Parkes on 2 October 1873, was a not long-term success. The stained-glass windows were reinstalled at the Church of Christ. Clergy-house and The school having been completed work on the church, was built in evening classes and day in 1873. The Internally chief features of interest are the nave arcade. Height is emphasized by the predominantly high-level windows and the tall chancel arch. Details of the interior architecture were published in 1878. The main block is arranged with a central chimney-stack in two three-bay divisions. The architect was Thomas H. B. Scott of Finsbury Square. A windmill was built beside Drunken Dock at the north end. Robert Todd bought the estate in 1771, lived until about 1787 at the mastmaker's house. 1835 made Millwall, an important centre of iron shipbuilding. The culmination of the shipbuilding boom was the creation of the Millwall Iron Works complex. The last significant industrial relics are the remnants of the Millwall Iron Works. Post-war industrial sheds stand derelict on the site of the Mast House at Ferguson's Wharf. The Mast House continued in the dock in operation, was the mastmaker's residence. Thomas Todd's house held at a ground rent on a 99-year lease. The ground remained largely open until the early 1840s. Todd's house was occupied by the firm of Brown in 1817. The closure of the Mast House bought the Mast House at auction. Prospective purchasers had been John Scott Russell, builder of the Great Eastern. Parts of the works were occupied subsequently by Company and Howlett by Laing. The collapse of the Millwall Iron Works was occupied by H. Fenner and N. J. for some years. A large pit was sunk for the storage of petroleum on the site of the Mast Pond. Part of the site occupied by lubricating-oil blenders by Turpentine Corporation Ltd and the British Oil. Both wharves were wrecked largely in 1935 by fire, had begun as a purpose-built factory. A substantial replacement comprising three floors and basement. The wharfingers carried simply out some repairs, the derelict paintmaking machinery. Goods stored included Christmas crackers and celluloid toys. The site of the dock was bought from Charles Augustus Ferguson in 1839. The dock formed later part of the Millwall Iron Works conglomeration. David Napier bought the site of Napier Yard in 1837 except for a row of old cottages. Joseph Westwood made wooden treads under the name Hawksley's Patent. A number of local people took shares in the new company. Andrew's Treads used extensively on tram platforms and bus in other buildings and railway stations. Westferry Road occupied also the former Millwall Iron Works premises for many years in Westferry Road. The roof and columns supported on the roof and columns. The upper floor had two rectangular windows per bay, carried on the tie-beams of the roof trusses. The stump of the chimney has been preserved as a feature of the Burrell. Fairbairn's works were by 1845 for sale, remained there the stump of the octagonal chimney. Napier Yard and the 1859 Millwall Iron Works were dominated by fitting-out and the construction. The completion of the ship was fraught with chief with troubles. The project bankrupted ultimately Scott Russell and the company, about Brunel's early death. The launch of the Great Eastern was the perhaps most exciting public spectacle since the Great Exhibition in London. Brunel had a few years, the construction of 5,000 ton ships. The Eastern Steam Navigation Company depended on fuelling. The scale of the Great Eastern was dictated by the space. The uncertainties involved in the launch, was realized that the slipways. The time of the launch had been widened on both sides by 20ft. The iron-on-iron technique were lubricated carefully with oil and blacklead. The main fitting-out contract was won by the ship and Scott Russell. The iron rails decking were dismantled probably soon after the main structure of the slipways after the launch. The remains comprising a section of the concrete-andtimber sub-structure. The refurbishment work was carried out by Feilden and Livingstone McIntosh Associates. The collapse of that company were occupied by various ship. A few weeks was in Graving Docks Company Ltd and Ship Building in the Millwall Iron Works and liquidation. The Millwall Iron Works of the 1860s was the most ambitious industrial concern. Shipbuilding Works and the Thames Iron built not only ships. The landside was concentrated the heavy plant for iron forgings. The scale of the armour-plate mill was vast in diameter with a flywheel 36ft. Part of the old Millwall Iron Works remained into the 1990s in use. The Westferry Road end were partly galleried ground-floor workshops with open timber-truss roofs with toplit. The war encouraged further concentration on colours, produced a variety of chemicals for the government. Paint production ceased after the war distemper in 1943. Single iron rods are held at the junction of the rafters between cast-iron shoulderpieces. Iron rods are fixed also beneath the tie beams between cast-iron studs and the queen rods. The tower was used from at the least late 1920s for water storage. Three private offices and The export office occupied the first floor. A rise had affected badly the housing market, sales at Burrell's Wharf. Beacon built around a smaller block and the ironworks chimney. The Robert Burns was built by Patrick Heyns in 1839, was extended by the local grazier Henry Bradshaw in 1853. The eventual purchaser was George Elliot, druggist and chemist. The building lessee of Ebenezer Terrace was Benjamin Moulton of Bishopsgate, a shipwright were proportioned meanly houses of three storeys on a small central window and the ground floor with single window and a roundarched doorway. Northumberland Yard was laid out as part of the Millwall Iron Works for shipbuilding. West Ham was an industrial village, an early centre of rubber manufacture was affected against the use of the Dutch engine by the widespread riots of silk-weavers, were bombed heavily during the Second World War, have varied greatly as size in speciality. West Ham is H. Green and R.. Both mills belonged within the City to corporate bodies. Silk-weaving was succeeded by calico-printing by a rival industry, has been suggested in England that the first calico-printer. The 1740s John Lefevre of West Ham was acting as the English agent of a textile-printer. The last firm being John Tucker was controlled while others from Germany, was taken over by Blackwell and Crosse in 1920, originated in 1886 in 1887. The last firm became part of the Berger, Nicholson group and Jenson had an engineering department over 1200 employees, specializing in fertilizers, built Canning Town factory was re-named the Silvertown Rubber Co. The last firm lost Canning Town. The leather trades were represented still well in 1848 in the parish. Recent research has produced new evidence, early years confirms the latter conclusion for few builders. Frye was the technical expert was carried on by Crowther and Weatherby. The Bow works stood on west of Marsh Gate Lane on the north side of High Street. The London and The Great Eastern Railway Co. maintained engineering workshops in West Ham. This remarkable industrial development had taken place within the fifty previous years, was attracted by the absence of by-law restrictions. Extensive waterways were also vital as water supply for transport and drainage. 1830s Walter Hancock and the 1820s was making steam carriages at Stratford. The building of the railway prepared the way for more rapid development. Silvertown were at Silvertown, works concentrate now on oil blending. Printing was concentrated mainly at Silvertown and Stratford at timber-milling and Plaistow, has been among West Ham's more important smaller industries. The most important chemical factories were at Silvertown and Stratford. The First World War TNT was made until 1917 by one Silvertown firm. Engineering was concerned chiefly with steamships and railways. The 1961 census of industry is not ideal for this purpose. Cent sample working in the main industrial groups, were employed in the main groups in communication and transport. The principal factory areas are Stratford Marsh and still Silvertown. The most important recent event has been the opening in 1967. The L.C.S. took subsequently over a number of other societies by 1969, were bombed badly in 1941. The 1954 society bought J. R. Roberts Stores, Stratford Broadway between 1957, are still in Maryland Street. Corn-milling declined as the ancient mills during the 19th century. The Co-operative Wholesale Society's mill was completed on a 5 a. site in 1901. The Premier Mill was opened by Joseph Rank Ltd. in 1904. The 1852 refinery was controlled apparently by Law Bros.. The 1862 Greenock firm of Duncan built Clyde Wharf refinery. James Duncan took charge was for many years, was closed in 1886. Tate was known best at Plaistow Wharf for Lyle and cube sugar. The two firms have been engaged as pies and sausages in the processing of meat foods, was taken later over by Henry Telfer Ltd., have specialized in the manufacture of paints, making machine tools and machinery, paving materials. The two firms have made packing cases and barrels. A reorganization scheme of 1968 refining was concentrated at Plaistow Wharf and Thames Wharf. The earliest manufacturing confectioner was Sons and Volckman. Loosé Ltd. had a factory in Stratford in Marshgate Lane. 1940 Cairn Mills was destroyed again this time by bombing. Gould's mill was enlarged with storage in 1932, was demolished in 1969. Smithfield Animal Products Trading Co. built a factory in 1920 in Marshgate Lane, is now part of the Smithfield. A few firms of distillers were established in the later 19th century. Mineral waters were being made in 1862 by two Stratford firms. Prince Regents Wharf was founded by H. P. Burt in 1856, importing railway sleepers remained for over a century at Prince Regents Wharf. 1929 Silvertown Lubricants was acquired by the Gulf Oil Corporation. The West Ham Chemical Works was founded apparently by James Childs. The Stirling Chemical Works was founded by Dunn in 1866. Co. and Thomas Tyler leased the works from Co. and Dunn, became associated closely in 1942 with Wilson chemical group and the Albright. Co. and Brunner Mond built a caustic soda factory at Silvertown at Crescent Wharf, was closed temporarily in 1912, became part of Imperial Chemical Industries by the 1936 Silvertown works in 1927. Matches and Explosives were among the earlier modern industries of the parish. Black and Bell camphorated patent wire and gas, a factory. Varnish and Paint has been made at different periods by some 50 firms. UsherWalker Ltd. opened a factory about 1892 in Sugar House Lane. The Usher-Walker group includes also Palmer Ltd. and Slater, Marshgate Lane. John Wilton was making candles in Carpenters Road in Stratford Broadway. Odams ensured a supply of raw material was taken over by the neighbouring Anglo-Continental Guano Works Ltd. in 1920. AngloContinental had been founded in 1873, was taken over by Fisons Ltd. in 1937. Frederick Hempleman's manure works Abbey Lane, later Crows Road. Hunt's products have included superphosphate, bone meal. Small workshops have been much more common than large ones. Green and Ashton became Sons and Wilmer about 1900, was sold in 1939 to a new directorate. Aiano's business was taken over by Robert Crampton about 1927. Marine engineering and Shipbuilding have been important in West Ham's industrial growth. H. Green and the First World War R. is a now subsidiary of the Peninsular. Sons and Bonallack built later a factory is a now subsidiary of James Booth Aluminium Ltd.. The building of steam carriages was carried in High Street on by Walter Hancock. The Eastern Counties Railway had a small repair depot by 1839 at Stratford. Son and William Ritchie built a factory in Stratford in Carpenters Road. The Canning Town factory was bombed during the Second World War. Sons and William Goodacre opened a factory in 1863 in Abbey Lane, was taken over by Beautility Ltd.. The present century Goodacre built also up an engineering business. Sons and John Alderson had a factory by 1870 in Marshgate Lane, remained until about 1934. The clothing industry was examined critically in 1904, was fostered by the poverty of many casual male workers. Other abrasives and Emery cloth were being made in Stratford in High Street. W. J. Barsham was probably identical with the man of that name. The first glassworks had been opened in 1851 at Silvertown, were opened at Canning Town. Bombing were rebuilt are now subsidiaries of Pillar Holdings Ltd.. Son and J. Gliksten is listed sometimes among Stratford firms. The Silvertown explosion was rebuilt by 1936, concentrated later in 1960 Venesta on metal foils. The manufacture of paper was being carried apparently on at Stratford on at Spilemans mills. Several firms and A few paper-stainers making wall-paper and paper bags. Some 30 printers occur at different periods in directories. The Whitwell Press was founded by the Society of the Divine Compassion in 1901, was housed originally in Balaam Street in two shops, was concerned mainly with government contracts and religious printing. The Hancocks were brothers of Thomas Hancock, the pioneer of rubber. The original Gutta Percha Co. had left Stratford by 1862. That period gutta percha was used mainly in the manufacture of submarine cables. Co. and S. W. Silver originated as army agents and colonial in the 18th century. S. William Silver was associated closely with Charles Hancock. Eastern and 1921 Irwell merged with Sons and I. Frankenberg. Other products have been asbestos, brushes and baskets. Dick's Asbestos is a now subsidiary of Thomas W. Ward Ltd.. James Rivett was undertaker and a builder in High Street in Chapel Street. Robert Leabon Curtis built up a large estate agency, the manor of Vange Hall. Carpenters Road were bombed during the present ones and the Second World War. The course of this work was received from Newham Borough Libraries. The edible oil refinery operates the world's largest margarine factory at the site. Other oils are shipped throughout Britain to food-processing plants. The 2002 facility handled over 500000 tonnes of imports. A large amount of grain is processed nearby as ADM Milling and Allied Mills as Rank Hovis. The Deep Water Terminal opened in 1966, enjoyed success for over a decade.

YearList of locations in the Port of London
1298The cloth came steadily despite a protest from London.
1558Thomas Parker was living in 1558.
1645An unidentified gunpowder mill is mentioned in 1645.
1701Twothirds of the ground had been let in 1701.
1722A windmill was built beside Drunken Dock at the north end.
1738The industry has been found except in 1738.
1767Paper was being made in 1767 at St. Thomas's mill.
1771Robert Todd bought the estate in 1771.
1787Robert Todd lived until about 1787 at the mastmaker's house.
1806A naval lieutenant began experimenting for naval use in the use of chain.
1817Todd's house was occupied by the firm of Brown in 1817.
1818The manufacture of paper was being carried apparently on at Stratford on at Spilemans mills.
1820sThe earlier part of that period development was mainly.
1835The formation of Westferry Road was acquired.
1837David Napier bought the site of Napier Yard in 1837 except for a row of old cottages.
1839Other abrasives and Emery cloth were being made in Stratford in High Street.
1840The iron warehouse put up in 1840.
1845Fairbairn's works were by 1845 for sale.
1848The leather trades were represented still well in 1848 in the parish.
1851The first glassworks had been opened in 1851 at Silvertown.
1852The manufacture of paper was being carried apparently on at Stratford on at Spilemans mills.
1853The Robert Burns was extended by the local grazier Henry Bradshaw in 1853.
1854Hart were taken by a local publican on a short lease.
1856Prince Regents Wharf was founded by H. P. Burt in 1856.
1857The work was carried out in 1857.
1858Several iron buildings were built in 1858.
1859John Scott Russell laid the foundation stone in 1859.
1861Sons and John Alderson had a factory by 1870 in Marshgate Lane.
1862The original Gutta Percha Co. had left Stratford by 1862.
1864Son and William Ritchie built a factory in Stratford in Carpenters Road.
1865Jutespinning brought in 1865 to Stratford.
1866The Meesons were also at Grays Thurrock in business.
1870Sons and John Alderson had a factory by 1870 in Marshgate Lane.
1873The frigate Northumberland was built.
1875The 1870 works was built by the London in Plaistow Road.
1878Details of the interior architecture were published in 1878.
1882H. Green and R. had a branch in 1882 at Canning Town.
1884Co. and H. Wheeler founded at Maud Road in 1884.
1886James Duncan was closed in 1886.
1887The last firm originated in 1886 in 1887.
18901886 has been in Stratford in Sugar House Lane.
1893Co. and Brunner Mond built a caustic soda factory at Silvertown at Crescent Wharf.
1896Son and Towler came about 1896 to West Ham.
1899St Andrew was bought by Marten Ltd and Young in 1899.
1900Green and Ashton became Sons and Wilmer about 1900.
1901The Whitwell Press was founded by the Society of the Divine Compassion in 1901.
1903Flemings was wound up in 1903.
1904The clothing industry was examined critically in 1904.
1905Millennium Mill built in 1905 by Sons and W. Vernon.
1907A survey made in 1907.
1909A second factory was burnt down in 1909.
1910The Whitwell Press was housed originally in Balaam Street in two shops.
1912Co. and Brunner Mond was closed temporarily in 1912.
1917The First World War TNT was made until 1917 by one Silvertown firm.
1919A second factory was taken over by Eastern Trade Corporation and the African in 1919.
1920Odams was taken over by the neighbouring Anglo-Continental Guano Works Ltd. in 1920.
1921Van der Bergh has had a site since 1921.
1923Whitefields Ltd. was founded shortly before 1923.
1926A second factory acquired in 1926.
1927Aiano's business was taken over by Robert Crampton about 1927.
1930sThe principal new buildings were put up in the 1930s.
1932Gould's mill was enlarged with storage in 1932.
1934Sons and John Alderson remained until about 1934.
1935Both wharves were wrecked largely in 1935 by fire.
1936The Silvertown explosion was rebuilt by 1936.
1937AngloContinental was taken over by Fisons Ltd. in 1937.
1939Green and Ashton was sold in 1939 to a new directorate.
1940A second factory was bombed in 1940.
1941The L.C.S. were bombed badly in 1941.
1942Co. and Thomas Tyler became associated closely in 1942 with Wilson chemical group and the Albright.
1943Paint production ceased after the war distemper in 1943.
1952Sons and T. H. Harris left West Ham about 1952.
1953A second factory was transferred in 1953 to Basildon.
1957The 1954 society bought J. R. Roberts Stores, Stratford Broadway between 1957.
1958Gaverick Street was cleared in 1958 by Poplar Borough Council.
1961I.C.I. left Silvertown about 1961.
1963The Stratford railway works was closed in 1963.
1966The Deep Water Terminal opened in 1966.
1967The most important recent event has been the opening in 1967.
1969Gould's mill was demolished in 1969.
1970sA family business was wound up in the early 1970s.
1972This small former church was replaced at Island House by a new church.
1980sThe principal new buildings survived largely intact until the 1980s.
1985This single-storey building was reported that plans in 1985.
1990sPart of the old Millwall Iron Works remained into the 1990s in use.

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